Monthly Archives: March 2015

Puzzle #94: Number Grid

Each of the spaces in a three-by-three grid has one of the integers from one to nine. Each value is used once.

1) The three values in the left column are consecutive odds.

2) The three values in the right column are consecutive evens.

3) The three values in the middle row are consecutive primes.

4) The three values in the bottom row are consecutive.

How are the integers arranged in the grid?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #92 Solution: Grandma’s Oatmeal Cookies

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

Industry Analysts

I used to be impressed by industry analysts’ statements that, say, sales in a certain segment of the computer industry would increase by so many percent over the next year.

I wondered how they figured it out. What modern equivalent of a crystal ball did they have?

Hey, I was young[er]. I was naive.

After seeing many cases of nonsensical predictions, I wised up. After seeing many cases of a tech company hitting a slow-down and seeing the analysts’ knives come out, I wised up. For one, I am really tired of hearing about how horribly Blackberry is doing and how everything it does is just wrong, wrong, wrong. If an analyst thinks he can do better, let him try.

Good analysts can make excellent points. All too often, what passes for analysis is someone ranting doom and gloom. I think that some so-called analysts delight in a company having problems. They certainly seem to milk such situations for all they are worth (and more, ad nauseam).

I am now rather cynical about such predictions and other analyst comments. I am not the only one. I was pleased to see industry analysts get a skewering by Infoworld’s Bill Snyder in http://www.infoworld.com/article/2883238/smartphones/apples-chorus-of-critics-how-wrong-can-they-be.html.

The article starts with “Your daughter comes home from school with a report card studded with A’s. You (1) give her a hug and raise her allowance or (2) ground her and tell her you know she’ll never do this well again.” and gets even better.

And the modern equivalent of the crystal ball? Maybe, they use dartboards.

Odd Language #90: Demonstrator

A USENET poster recently wrote: ‘My mother was a demonstrator when the Sir George Williams University “computer riot” happened in 1969.’

The issue: If that were all you read about the poster’s mother, you would probably have a rather different view than if you also read the next paragraph: “Except, she was demonstrating biology lab techniques.”

Puzzle #93: The Bowling Team

The bowling team consists of Alice, Bob, Connie, and Don. They made two statements each. One of them always tells the truth, one always lies, and the others alternate between the truth and lying. They won a bowling trophy last year which has gotten “lost”. One of them has it.

Alice: 1) Don has the trophy. 2) I do not have the trophy.

Bob: 1) Connie always lies. 2) I do not have the trophy.

Connie: 1) Don has been known to lie. 2) I have the trophy.

Don: 1) Someone else is the liar. 2) One of the women has the trophy.

Determine the truth of each of the eight statements and who has the trophy.

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #91 Solution: The Library

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow