Monthly Archives: November 2014

Puzzle #77: Chess Setup

You are about to set up your side of the board for a game of chess. Your chesspieces consist of one king, one queen, two bishops, two knights, two rooks, and eight pawns. There are exactly the same number of squares where each piece type can go. (For example, there are two squares where you can place the two knights.)

Since all of the pieces of one type are the same, it does not matter which piece of a type goes in each of the permitted squares, but if it did, how many different possible arrangements would there be for setting up your side of the board?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, November 26, 2014 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #75 Solution: Hallowe’en Traps

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

It Is Not All on the Internet

Take a look at Odd Language #73: Odd First Look. I could not be sure if the sign I had seen had had “Whisper” or “Whispers”. It was out of the question to check on the way back as I came back at night during snow and rain.

I know! I will check the Internet.

Nope. Nothing doing.

There is a lot on the Internet, but not everything is on it.

Have you been out to look at the Real World lately? (a.k.a. The Big Blue Room)

Odd Language #73: Odd First Look

I was in northern British Columbia last week for the first time in my life. On the way up, some distance north of Prince George, I saw a sign that stated “Whisper Day Care”. (It possibly may have been “Whispers”.)

The issue: As this was beside a highway in wilderness, I, naturally, did a double take. I had another look, and it turned out that it was “Whisper Bay Cove”.

Have you ever hilariously misread something?

Puzzle #76: Leaves

There are millions of leaves on your (or your parents’) lawn! OK, not really. Given:

1) The number of leaves is a four-digit number (abcd).
2) a times b equals d.
3) The digits are all different.
4) a plus b equals c.
5) Two of the digits are even, one digit is odd.
6) a equals 2.

How many leaves?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #74 Solution: Haunted Yard Plans

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow