Monthly Archives: October 2013

Puzzle #21: Logic Problem

Three students (Gordon, John, and Sue) each rent a different type of dwelling (apartment, dorm room, and house) and each have a different type of pet (cat, dog, and goldfish). From the clues below, determine who rents what and has what kind of pet.

  1. John’s dog likes chasing the apartment dweller’s cat.
  2. Gordon keeps his dorm room neat.
  3. Cats and dogs are not allowed in a dorm room.

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #19 Solution: Puppies!

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

Agreement or What?

Some people do not seem able to ever admit that they are wrong.  They have a phrase that they use to avoid having to admit being wrong: “Yes but—” and without anything following. It is how to disagree while seeming to agree.

If you are running into this phrase, just know that the person using it has run out of arguments and that there is little point in continuing to argue. Do not let it get you down. I hope that you do not use it yourself.

Odd Language #17: Comma Use

From a USENET post: “We bought my Granddaughter one two or three years ago.”

The issue: A comma after “one” would have made it slavery, but without one, it means that the granddaughter was bought one of some item two or three years ago.  Orally, it would be ambiguous.

Puzzle #20: Luggage Combinations

Is your luggage combination 1234? There are jokes about that.

It would be a bad idea to select too obvious a combination, whatever that amounts to. We could make up all sorts of rules about what combinations are obvious. Limiting it to the following, how many supposedly unobvious combinations are left? It is too obvious if the combination:

  1. has all the same digit or three of the same digit,
  2. has two pairs of digits regardless of the order,
  3. has the digits in ascending order or descending order, or
  4. forms an obvious arithmetic equation. Examples of these are: 7815 (7 + 8 = 15), 1798 (17 – 9 = 8), 9654 (9 × 6 = 54), and lastly 8199 (81 ÷ 9 = 9). Consider leading zeroes so 2024 is out (2 + 02 = 4).

There are unobvious combinations, but how many?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #18 Solution: Kittens!

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

Group Activities

For two weeks, I have mentioned the importance of promotion in connection with gaming conventions and other activities.

The convention that I was at two weekends ago was great, but there was a time Saturday evening where no one was interested in playing board games. I decided that it would be better if I were playing rather than not playing so I asked if I could get into a game of “The Mutant Epoch” roleplaying game that was about to start. (URL: http://www.mutantepoch.com/)

It really was not the sort of game that I would have picked up myself, but I really had a good time. I was playing it again last weekend.

Sometimes, good company is more important than a good game. If you have both (and I did here), it is great.

Invite someone to do some activity with you. Maybe, you will get a convert.

Odd Language #16: Only

From Kamloops’s “The Daily News”, Thursday, 2013-09-26, p. A1, headline (lead story):

“ONLY PHOTOS OF DEAD SON STOLEN”

The issue: The article is about how the only photos of a couple’s dead son were stolen, but it could mean that photos and nothing else were stolen.

Puzzle #19: Puppies!

Oh, look! A box full of puppies. Since puppies are generally bigger than kittens, there are only eight of them. All of them are at least one colour of black, white, and tan. Five are black, five are white, and five are tan.

What is the maximum number of the seven colour combinations that could occur? What is the minimum number of the seven colour combinations that could occur?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #17 Solution: Marbles

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow