Not Letting One’s Hopes Get Blighted

Do you have some dream or hope you would like to realise?

I hope so. Part of being alive is having such.

Some people will help. Some will try to blight your hopes.

I have some stuff that my recently-deceased mom left. In exchange for some keepsake, I want to donate the rest of the stuff to someone starting in that area. When I pitched it to the first person, I got shot down, including that other similar people were in the same situation.

I contacted one of the others anyway and got a good reception.

I could have stopped and allowed my hope get blighted. I did not.

Sometimes, one has to fight for one’s dreams.

May you get what you dream for.

Puzzle #175: Fun Names

This puzzle is not so math-oriented. Instead, try thinking about things differently.

Can you have fun with company names and how the fun version might be marketed?

When I lived in Bellingham, I came up with a spoof version of Horizon Bank. “Tired of dealing with banks with their headquarters in huge skyscrapers? Deal with a bank that is down to earth. Come to Horizontal Bank. Member FDIC.”

Give the correct (or known-by) name of a company, your fun name (one point), and marketing message (optional and also one point). Note that the fun version need not be in the same business. It just has to sound similar. Now, keep doing it.

How many points can you get out of Kamloops?

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, October 12, 2016 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #173 Solution: Marbles

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

Puzzle #174: Breaky!

The small breakfast smorg included eggs, bacon, and sausage.

The first diner took one-third of the eggs, one-third of the bacon, and no sausage.

The second diner took one-half of the eggs, no bacon, and one-third of the sausage.

The third diner took one-half of the eggs, two slices of bacon, and two sausages.

The fourth diner took one-half of the eggs, bacon, and sausage.

At that point, one egg, one slice of bacon, and one sausage remained. How much did each diner take, and how much of each item was there originally?

[Fractions refer how much a diner took of what was there at the time.]

Submit your answer to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Your answer should be in the form of a proof. That means to show how your answer must be correct. The deadline is Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at noon Pacific Time. I will post the answer shortly after.

Puzzle #172 Solution: Trees

Spoiler Inside: Solution to Puzzle SelectShow

Could Be, But Not Necessarily

It is possible to get too used to things being a certain way. Sometimes, people lose sight of the fact that it is possible for things to be different.

My example is with names. Many names have shorter or more casual forms. My name is Eugene, and I go by Gene. Ladies named Tamara often go by Tammy. I also know a Tamsin who goes by Tammy. And so on.

The reverse is not a sure thing. A shorter name is not necessarily a short form.

I work with a lady named Tammy. She has said that she has gotten into trouble with government offices who insist on knowing her real first name. Her real first name really is Tammy. For her, it is not a short form.

The world is a very big place. There is room for many ways of doing things besides yours or mine.

Odd Language #170: Odd List

I was writing a sentence expressing my availability and came up with this oddity: “For this week, I will be out of town Tuesday and Wednesday and late Thursday afternoon and Friday.”

The issue: Items in a list can consist of multiple items. For example, “I know Bob and Marsha; Beth and Tom; and Freddie and Fred.” expresses that one knows three couples. In my sentence, I wanted to group Tuesday and Wednesday as one item and late Thursday afternoon and Friday as another.

If my list had had three items, I could have used the same form as the couples sentence, as in “For this week, I will be out of town Tuesday and Wednesday; late Thursday afternoon and Friday; and Sunday.” With two, I was stuck as “For this week, I will be out of town Tuesday and Wednesday; and late Thursday afternoon and Friday.” does not look right.

I finally added a few words: “For this week, I will be out of town for Tuesday and Wednesday and then late Thursday afternoon and Friday.” I would have preferred the bare list.